a researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. the researcher will not interact with the children. this research would be eligible for which type of irb review?

a researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. the researcher will not interact with the children. this research would be eligible for which type of irb review?

Friday, September 15, 2017

11:08 PM

A researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. The researcher will not interact with the children. This research would be eligible for which type of IRB review?

This research would not require IRB review because it would be eligible for exemption since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is a public setting.

This research would require full committee review since it involves children.

This research would be eligible for expedited IRB review since the researcher is participating in the activities observed.

This research would be eligible for expedited IRB review since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is public.

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Answer: This research would not require IRB review because it would be eligible for exemption since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is a public setting.

a researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. the researcher will not interact with the children. this research would be eligible for which type of irb review?

a researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. the researcher will not interact with the children. this research would be eligible for which type of irb review?

Friday, September 15, 2017

11:08 PM

A researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. The researcher will not interact with the children. This research would be eligible for which type of IRB review?

This research would not require IRB review because it would be eligible for exemption since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is a public setting.

This research would require full committee review since it involves children.

This research would be eligible for expedited IRB review since the researcher is participating in the activities observed.

This research would be eligible for expedited IRB review since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is public.

Answer: This research would not require IRB review because it would be eligible for exemption since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is a public setting.

According to a recent study, what is the world’s deadliest animal?

According to a recent study, what is the world’s deadliest animal?

Thursday, September 14, 2017

5:32 PM

According to a recent study, what is the world’s deadliest animal?

· Snake

· Crocodile

· Shark

· Mosquito

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Answer: The world’s deadliest animal isn’t a shark or even a snake. Most of the deaths caused by animals, it turns out, have less to do with the animals themselves than the diseases they transmit. Mosquitoes – the pesky bugs that suck blood and transmit viruses from person to person are responsible for the most animal-related deaths. According to the World Health Organization, about 725,000 people are killed every year by mosquito-borne diseases. Malaria alone affects 200 million, of which an estimated 600,000 die.

Answer:

Mosquito

Trump says no deal on DACA, wants ‘big’ border security

Trump says no deal on DACA, wants ‘big’ border security

Thursday, September 14, 2017

5:10 PM

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FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington D.C., August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday said any move on illegal immigrants brought to the United States as children would have to be tied to security, disputing Democratic congressional leaders who said they had reached a deal with him on the issue.

"No deal was made last night on DACA. Massive border security would have to be agreed to in exchange for consent. Would be subject to vote," Trump wrote in one of a series of posts on Twitter.

He was referring to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program created by former President Barack Obama.

"The Wall (on the U.S.-Mexico border), which is already under construction in the form of new renovation of old and existing fences and walls, will continue to be built," Trump also wrote.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and House of Representatives Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi earlier said they had come to an agreement with Trump at a dinner meeting at the White House Wednesday evening.

"We agreed to enshrine the protections of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) into law quickly, and to work out a package of border security, excluding the wall, that’s acceptable to both sides," Schumer and Pelosi said in a statement.

The White House disputed that assessment.

"While DACA and border security were both discussed, excluding the wall was certainly not agreed to," White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said on Twitter on Wednesday night.

Still, Trump on Thursday appeared to acknowledge the complexity of handing the issue of the immigrant children dubbed Dreamers.

A mainstay of his 2016 presidential campaign was a promise to build a wall along the southern U.S. border aimed at keeping immigrants and drugs out. He had said Mexico would pay for it but has since requested money from the U.S. Congress.

"Does anybody really want to throw out good, educated and accomplished young people who have jobs, some serving in the military? Really!" Trump wrote in another tweet.

"They have been in our country for many years through no fault of their own – brought in by parents at young age. Plus big border security."

(Reporting by Susan Heavey; editing by John Stonestreet)

Hello, world. Meet our baby girl: Alexis Olympia Ohanian, Jr. – YouTube

Hello, world. Meet our baby girl: Alexis Olympia Ohanian, Jr. – YouTube

Thursday, September 14, 2017

1:32 PM

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Clipped from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYoRmfI0LUc

kenneka jenkins what happened

kenneka jenkins what happened

Thursday, September 14, 2017

1:24 PM

Amid pressure from Kenneka Jenkins’ family, police offer new details of death probe – Chicago Tribune

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People gather outside the Crowne Plaza Chicago O’Hare Hotel & Conference Center in Rosemont to protest the handling of the death investigation of Kenneka Jenkins, who was found inside a walk-in freezer in a vacant part of the hotel. (John J. Kim / Chicago Tribune)

People gather outside the Crowne Plaza Chicago O’Hare Hotel & Conference Center in Rosemont to protest the handling of the death investigation of Kenneka Jenkins, who was found inside a walk-in freezer in a vacant part of the hotel. (John J. Kim / Chicago Tribune)

Rosemont officials released some new details late Wednesday about their investigation into the death of Kenneka Jenkins and said they will share hotel surveillance video with her mother.

The developments came as members of Jenkins’ family and others protested in front of the hotel where the Chicago teen was found dead Sunday after attending a party there.

Earlier Wednesday, Rosemont Mayor Bradley Stephens said local police are working with outside agencies to investigate Jenkins’ death but that fevered online guesswork about the case is hindering the probe.

"It’s unfortunate that some of that stuff’s convoluting the investigation because all those leads have got to be followed up on," he said after his annual state of the village address to the Rosemont Chamber of Commerce.

"As I’m sure you’ve seen, there’s a lot of different, conflicting speculation out there, so (police) are doing their best to come to a quick resolution, obviously. I think everybody wants to know what happened."

Jenkins, 19, was attending a party in a room of the Crowne Plaza Chicago O’Hare Hotel & Conference Center when she went missing early Saturday. Her family arrived to look for her a few hours later but said hotel staff and village police didn’t join the search until the afternoon.

Jenkins’ body was eventually found in a walk-in freezer in a vacant part of the hotel, authorities said. She was pronounced dead just before 1 a.m. Sunday.

Rosemont spokesman Gary Mack said police plan to show surveillance video from the hotel to Jenkins’ mother, Tereasa Martin, on Thursday, but will not release it to the public until the investigation is finished — a resolution that could be weeks away.

"We’re trying to be as understanding as we can to the mom and to be as compassionate as we can," he said. "Now that our detectives have had the chance to look at it, we’re hopeful it will be helpful to her."

Mack would not describe the contents of the video, and officials continue to say little about what they’ve learned about the circumstances surrounding Jenkins’ death or the eventual discovery of her body.

Rosemont police released a statement Wednesday describing the scope of their investigation. They said they are reviewing video from 47 surveillance cameras at the hotel, as well as videos posted on social media, and that some of the footage is being analyzed by forensic technicians.

Police said they’ve interviewed eight people who were present at the hotel when Jenkins went missing, along with four others "who were involved in some way." Authorities are also seeking to locate and speak with four other people they have identified as having been "present the night of the gathering."

"At this time, the incident is still an active death investigation. Our detectives are working around the clock to identify, locate and interview all persons who were involved," the police statement said.

Martin has said police told her that Jenkins apparently let herself into the freezer while intoxicated and died inside.

The Cook County medical examiner has yet to release a cause of death. A spokeswoman said Wednesday that new information won’t be available for weeks, pending further studies and the police investigation.

Martin, who could not be reached for comment Wednesday, has expressed anger over what she believes was a lack of urgency by police and hotel staff when she came looking for her daughter, but Stephens said village police did a good job.

"Generally, in any missing persons case, it’s 24 hours … before a report is filed," he said. "So I think the public safety department is handling it well."

He said village police are getting help from outside agencies — a spokesman later said that includes the Cook County sheriff’s office, which has offered the use of a database to help locate interview subjects — and asked for patience as the investigation continues.

"This is something that’s going to take some time," Stephens said. "This appears to be a one-off incident, and again, if they can get to the bottom of it sooner rather than later, I think it makes everybody have a little bit of peace."

Despite the dearth of confirmed facts surrounding the case, speculation that Jenkins’ death was the result of foul play has been rampant on social media.

Wednesday night, frustration over the pace of the investigation investigation found voice in a several-hour protest outside the hotel that included several of Jenkins’ relatives.

A small but riled up group of protesters swarmed the entrance of the Crowne Plaza Hotel.

About two dozen people shouted, "Justice for Kenneka!" as they pleaded with patrons of the hotel to boycott the hotel. Many in the group pounded on the windows of the hotel and held signs up to the windows, eliciting concerned looks from guests inside.

"Are you really comfortable giving them your money when a 19-year-old was found dead in the freezer?" one woman said to a passing guest.

Police stood guard at the entrances and blocked protesters in several attempts to enter the building.

Relatives, including Jenkins’ sister, joined the ranks in demanding answers. Some of the signs continued to propagate rumors swirling around the case, many insinuating foul play was involved.

Others said they were eagerly awaiting the results of the autopsy before jumping to conclusions.

Jenkins’ cousin Jasmine Webster, 27, said the family was comforted by others standing with them.

"I am very happy to see people out here asking for justice for my cousin," Webster said as she stood beside those lining River Road calling out to passing traffic.

kjanssen@chicagotribune.com

jkeilman@chicagotribune.com

The Chicago Tribune’s Tony Briscoe contributed.

For what accomplishment is Frederick Muhlenberg remembered?

For what accomplishment is Frederick Muhlenberg remembered?

Sunday, September 10, 2017

5:42 PM

For what accomplishment is Frederick Muhlenberg remembered?

· First Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives

· First German U.S. governor

· Invented hot air balloons

· Holder of U.S. Patent #1

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· First Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives 22.4%

Unable to make ends meet as a minister, Muhlenberg entered politics in 1779 as a member of the Continental Congress. He won election to the first U.S. Congress from Pennsylvania in 1789. He agreed to serve as the first Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and became the first signer of the Bill of Rights. He won reelection multiple times, serving as Speaker again for the third U.S. Congress. Source: SpeakersHouse.org

· First German U.S. governor 16.1%

· Invented hot air balloons 32.5%

· Holder of U.S. Patent # 129.0%

Caribbean Devastated as Irma Heads Toward Florida – The New York Times

Caribbean Devastated as Irma Heads Toward Florida – The New York Times

Saturday, September 9, 2017

1:10 AM

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Clipped from: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/us/destruction-caribbean-irma-florida.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=a-lede-package-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

U.S.

By FRANCES ROBLES, KIRK SEMPLE and VIVIAN YEESEPT. 7, 2017

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Extreme Weather By BARBARA MARCOLINI Play Video 1:12 ‘We Have Nothing Left’: Islanders Survey Irma’s Destruction

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‘We Have Nothing Left’: Islanders Survey Irma’s Destruction

Two residents from St. Martin island’s two nations, the French St. Martin and the Dutch St. Maarten, describe Irma’s destruction.

By BARBARA MARCOLINI on Publish Date September 7, 2017. Photo by Lionel Chamoiseau/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images. Watch in Times Video »

· embed

Read the latest with Friday’s live updates on Hurricane Irma.

SAN JUAN, P.R. — One of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes ever recorded crescendoed over the Caribbean on Thursday, crumpling islands better known as beach paradises into half-habitable emergency zones and sideswiping Puerto Rico before churning north. It is expected to hit the Florida Keys and South Florida by Saturday night.

More than 60 percent of households in Puerto Rico were without power. On St. Martin, an official said 95 percent of the island was destroyed. The Haitian government called for all agencies, stores and banks to shut down as the storm hit. Prime Minister Gaston Browne of Antigua and Barbuda said that half of Barbuda had been left homeless.

Watching Hurricane Irma maraud across Barbuda and Anguilla, residents of Florida and others who found themselves on the wrong side of the forecast were hastening to get out of the way. Government officials in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina pleaded for people to evacuate vulnerable areas, triggering a scramble for the essentials — gasoline, water, sandbags — that, even for hurricane-hardened Floridians, was laced with dread and punctuated with dire warnings from every direction.

A shortage of gasoline and bottled water, always a headache in the days before hurricanes, grew more acute in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, as the production of Houston oil refineries shrank and fuel and water were diverted to Texas. Pump lines in South Florida sprawled for blocks as fleeing residents sucked up what gas they could, and some drivers chased after tankers they had spied on the roads.

Gov. Rick Scott of Florida urged extreme caution in the face of a powerful storm that could quickly change course. “Every Florida family must prepare to evacuate regardless of the coast you live on,” he said.

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By the time Rosi Edreira and her husband got the order to leave their home in Cutler Bay, part of the second evacuation zone in Miami-Dade County, they had already made plans to seek shelter in Charlotte, N.C. Into the car would go photo albums, birth certificates, nearly 400 Christmas ornaments collected over a quarter-century and their two dogs, JJ and Coco Puff, and cat, Dicky.

Photo

Felipe Martinez removed fallen branches in San Juan, P.R., on Thursday. Credit Erika P. Rodriguez for The New York Times

“I did Andrew,” said Ms. Edreira, 49, recalling the massive Category 5 hurricane that ripped off her roof 25 years ago last month. “I’m not doing that again.”

By Thursday night, Irma’s 175-mile-an-hour winds and pelting rains had already serially ransacked the islands of the eastern Caribbean, leaving at least seven dead and whole communities flattened.

Not all the news was awful. Despite the loss of power to most of the island, damage and loss of life on Puerto Rico was far less than feared. Haiti and the Dominican Republic, which share the island of Hispaniola, were also spared direct hits.

But the terror of the storm left people grasping for superlatives.

“There are shipwrecks everywhere, destroyed houses everywhere, torn-off roofs everywhere,” the president of the French territorial council on St. Martin, Daniel Gibbs, told Radio Caraïbes International.

“It’s just unbelievable,” he added. “It’s indescribable.”

In Puerto Rico — among Irma’s less unfortunate casualties — the lights were out. In many places, so was running water.

Though the hurricane barely brushed the island, it managed to knock out its aging electrical system. More than a million customers were without power on Thursday, and a little more than half of the hospitals were functional. Even before a single raindrop fell, the head of the company, which is effectively bankrupt, had predicted that if the storm packed a wallop, it could take four to six months to completely re-establish service. His prediction infuriated Puerto Ricans, who see the latest development as yet another shameful indignity in the island’s yearslong economic decline.

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Photo

Buildings were damaged by Hurricane Irma on the French side of the island of St. Martin on Thursday. Credit Lionel Chamoiseau/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

How is it possible, they wanted to know, that a hurricane that had passed at a safe distance and hardly claimed a shingle could leave so many in the dark?

Puerto Rico’s plunge into darkness has been long coming. In July, the huge, government-owned power authority defaulted on a deal to restructure $9 billion in debt, effectively declaring bankruptcy.

It has neither modernized nor kept up with maintenance. Trees have gone untrimmed, poles unattended. (The electric company did not respond to repeated requests for comment.)

Gov. Ricardo A. Rosselló said the authorities could not estimate how long it would take to get the power back until officials were able to survey the damage.

Thursday afternoon he said service had been restored to 144,000 households — which still left nearly a million out.

Still, he said, things could have been much worse.

“We would like to start out thanking the almighty,” Mr. Rosselló said. “Our prayers were answered.”

Photo

Residents in Port St. Lucie, Fla., prepared for Hurricane Irma’s approach at Home Depot. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

On other islands, the reckoning was far more stark.

On St. Martin, a part-French, part-Dutch possession where at least four people died as a result of the storm, aerial footage taken by the military showed streets inundated with water and homes devastated by winds. The second wave of destruction, for businesses at least, was man-made: looters were picking through the remains, sometimes in view of police officers who stood idly by, “as if they were buying groceries,” said Maeva-Myriam Ponet, a correspondent for a television network based in Guadeloupe, another French Overseas Territory in the Caribbean.

St. Martin remained mostly isolated from the outside world on Thursday, lacking power and most cellphone service.

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Ms. Ponet, who reports for the Guadeloupe 1ère network, said the residents of St. Martin felt utterly neglected. “Help will arrive tonight,” she said, “but for the moment, they don’t have anything.”

The nearby island of St. Barthélemy, another French territory, was also hard hit, as was Barbuda, where half of the island’s residents were reportedly left homeless.

The network’s correspondent in St. Barthélemy, Eric Rayapin, described a “spectacle of desolation,” with the island all but severed from the outside world. There had been little or no phone service, water or electricity since Tuesday night.

Buildings have been “ravaged,” he said, and many roads have been destroyed.

“The population here is suffering enormously,” Mr. Rayapin reported. “Some of them have lost their houses, the cars have been flipped over in the middle of the street, and all vegetation has been destroyed.”

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Photo

Rue Kindred hung hurricane shutters on his home in White City, Fla., on Thursday. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

He added: ”It’s a very hard blow.”

John McKendrick, Anguilla’s attorney general, said that the island, a British possession, had suffered “huge devastation” from the hurricane.

Most of the island’s homes had been damaged, fallen trees had blocked many roads, cellphone service was interrupted and electrical service was cut. The entire island was still without power midday Thursday, and the ports and the airport remained closed. One person in Anguilla died, Mr. Kendrick said, though he did not know the circumstances.

“It’s been bad,” Mr. McKendrick said in a telephone interview from London, where he had been traveling when the hurricane struck the island. “A lot of people are exhausted and a lot of homes are damaged.”

He said the authorities were still trying to assess the full scope of the destruction.

In Haiti, the government called for all institutions to be shut down from noon on Thursday until further notice. President Jovenel Moïse urged people to get to a safe place.

“The hurricane is not a game,” he said.

The danger was not only of drownings and injuries from the storm. Officials worried that a surge of cholera could follow, as it did last year after Hurricane Matthew devastated the country’s southwest. Government reports show that cholera has killed 104 people this year. More than 10,000 peopl have died from the waterborne disease since it broke out in Haiti in 2010. In an effort to avert another flare-up, Haiti’s minister of public health urged people to add bleach to their drinking and bathing water and to assemble first-aid kits at home.

Among the deepest concerns of Mr. McKendrick, the Anguilla attorney general, was the approach of Hurricane Jose, declared a Category 3 storm on Thursday, which is expected to make its way through this same part of the Caribbean on Saturday. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for Antigua and Barbuda and a Tropical Storm watch was issued for Anguilla, Montserrat, St. Kitts, Nevis, Saba and St. Eustatius.

“A 137-mile-per-hour storm is on the way,” he said. “I’m not sure how the island can respond to that.”

In Miami, Elizabeth Chifari, 66, was determined to stay home with her white alley cat, Friday, and ride out the storm.

She would have gone to stay with her son, Andrew. But he lives in Houston.

“If they lived anywhere else,” she said, “I would’ve considered it.”

Correction: September 8, 2017

Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article misstated the number of people in Haiti who have died from cholera since the disease’s outbreak there in 2010. More than 10,000 people have died since the outbreak, not 104. (That is the number who have died from cholera this year, government reports show.)

Frances Robles reported from San Juan, P.R., Kirk Semple from Mexico City and Vivian Yee from New York. Catherine Porter contributed from Haiti; Maggie Astor, Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Megan Specia from New York; Marc Santora, Emily Cochrane and Lizette Alvarez from Miami; Erica Wells in the Bahamas; Carl Joseph in Barbuda; Azam Ahmed in the Dominican Republic; Paulina Villegas in Mexico City; and Aurelien Breeden and Elian Peltier in Paris.

A version of this article appears in print on September 8, 2017, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Irma Razes Islands and Leaves Puerto Rico Dark. Order Reprints| Today’s Paper|Subscribe

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Congress sends Trump disaster aid, debt limit increase

Congress sends Trump disaster aid, debt limit increase

Friday, September 8, 2017

8:32 PM

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Clipped from: https://www.yahoo.com/news/congress-sends-trump-disaster-aid-debt-limit-increase-144602317–business.html?soc_trk=gcm&soc_src=60f73942-c8f9-11e5-bc86-fa163e798f6a&.tsrc=notification-brknews

FILE PHOTO: The U.S. Capitol Building is lit at sunset in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives on Friday passed and sent to President Donald Trump legislation providing $15.25 billion in emergency disaster aid, as well as raising government borrowing authority and funding federal programs through Dec. 8.

The House vote of 316-90 came one day after the Senate passed the measure. Lawmakers were rushing to approve the legislation before government disaster aid was projected to run ran out at week’s end and as the deadly Hurricane Irma was projected to bear down on Florida.

Trump is expected to promptly sign the measure into law.

(Reporting By Amanda Becker and Richard Cowan)